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Yes - The Yes Album - White Hot Stamper (With Issues)

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

White Hot Stamper (With Issues)

Yes
The Yes Album

Regular price
$299.99
Regular price
Sale price
$299.99
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per 
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Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus*

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus*

  • A Big As They Get original pressing with Shootout Winning Triple Plus (A+++) sound from start to finish - I've Seen All Good People will blow your mind
  • You haven't begun to hear the weight, energy and space of Yes's brilliant third album until you've played one of our Shootout Winning copies
  • On the right system, at the right volume (very loud), this very record is an immersive experience like practically no other
  • A Top 100 Album and the band's best sounding record if you ask us (although Fragile can sound absolutely amazing too, just not as smooth and rich)
  • "Organist Tony Kaye, guitarist Steve Howe and bass player Chris Squire play as though of one mind, complementing each other's work as a knowledgeable band should."

More Yes Album / More Yes

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*CONDITION NOTES:

  • On side one, a tiny mark makes 5 light crackles, followed by 1 moderate pop one inch into Track 1, Yours Is No Disgrace.
  • On side two, a mark makes a few intermittent moderate pops followed by 20 moderate pops one-quarter inch into Track 3, Starship Trooper.

Sometimes the copy with the best sound is not the copy with the quietest vinyl. The best sounding copy is always going to win the shootout, the condition of its vinyl notwithstanding. If you can tolerate the problems on this pressing you are in for some amazing Yes music and sound. If for any reason you are not happy with the sound or condition of the album we are of course happy to take it back for a full refund, including the domestic return postage.


Drop the needle on this bad boy and you will find yourself on a Yes journey the likes of which you have never known. And that's what I'm in this audiophile game for. The Heavy Vinyl crowd can have their dead-as-a-doornail, wake-me-when-it's-over pressings that play quietly. I couldn't sit through one with a gun to my head.

With the amazing Eddie Offord at the board, as well as the best batch of songs ever to appear on a single Yes album, they produced both their sonic and musical masterpiece -- good news for audiophiles with Big Speakers who like to play their records loud.

These guys -- and by that I mean this particular iteration of the band, the actual players that were involved in the making of this album -- came together for the first time and created the sound of Yes on this very album, rather aptly titled when you think about it.

What amazing sides on Yes's Breakthrough Album have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1970
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We're Listening For on The Yes Album

The main qualities we look for when we shootout Yes records are:

1. Dynamics - The best copies have amazing dynamics. Some parts of this album should be STARTLING in their power. There is a fair amount of compression on this recording in places, don't get me wrong, but on the right copies many passages of this music will have tremendous life and energy.

2. Smoothness - This album can be harsh and unpleasant if the upper midrange is boosted at all, or lacks a full lower midrange to balance it out. The last thing in the world you want is a bright, harsh Yes record.

3. Bass - Bass definition and weight are CRUCIAL to the sound of this record. The thin-sounding copies rob Yes's music of much of its POWER and are downgraded severely for it.

The Seventies - What a Decade!

Tubey Magical Acoustic Guitar reproduction is superb on the better copies of this recording. Simply phenomenal amounts of Tubey Magic can be heard on every strum, along with richness, body and harmonic coherency that have all but disappeared from modern recordings (and remasterings).

This is some of the best High-Production-Value rock music of the '70s. The amount of effort that went into the recording of this album is comparable to that expended by the engineers and producers of bands like Supertramp, ELP, The Who, Jethro Tull, Ambrosia, Pink Floyd and far too many others to list. It seems that no effort or cost was spared in making the home listening experience as compelling as the recording technology of the day permitted.

Big Production Tubey Magical British Prog Rock just doesn't get much better than The Yes Album.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of other pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

Side One

  • Yours Is No Disgrace
  • The Clap
  • Starship Trooper
  • a. "Life Seeker"
    b. "Disillusion"
    c. "Würm"

Side Two

  • I've Seen All Good People
  • a. "Your Move"
    b. "All Good People"
  • A Venture
  • Perpetual Change

Rolling Stone Review

With one notable exception, Yes' configuration has remained stable since the first of its three albums was released two years ago. Singer Jon Anderson spearheaded Yes then and still does. But some time after Yes recorded its second album, Time and a Word, guitarist Peter Banks left the band to replace Mick Abrahams who had similarly abandoned Blodwyn Pig. Before anything much happened with the newly aligned Blodwyn, Kim Simmonds lured bassist Andy Pyle and drummer Ron Berg over to Savoy Brown. What Banks is doing now is anybody's guess. His replacement is Steve Howe, a guitarist of equal caliber who featured prominently on Yes' third record.

The Yes Album differs from its two predecessors in several respects. For the first time, everything the group performs is original material. Although Yes deserves praise for having matured to the point where it can supply enough of its own songs for an entire album, I personally miss hearing one of two versions of someone else's songs, like "I See You" and "No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed," which the group arranged and performed brilliantly on its first and second albums, respectively. In addition, the material consists of fewer short songs and more lengthy pieces. The only three-minute tracks on this record are "The Clap," Steve Howe's acoustic guitar quickie recorded at one of Yes' concerts in London, and "A Venture," a straightforward rocker sandwiched between a pair of longer compositions on the second side.

Each of the album's four long tracks are carefully structured and allow for greater instrumental freedom than their shorter counterparts. Frequently, a particular melodic theme first stated by one musician is echoed by another, such as in "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "I've Seen All Good People." Organist Tony Kaye, guitarist Steve Howe and bass player Chris Squire play as though of one mind, complementing each other's work as a knowledgeable band should. Squire in particular deserves to be singled out for his creative bass work throughout the album. Bill Bruford's tasteful drumming never falls in the way of the other musicians.

As for the vocals, Yes has an ear for harmony and takes full advantage of this asset. Squire and Howe supplement Anderson's delightful leads with harmonies in the upper register. On the first hearing, Yes' vocals may seem too perfectly matched to be enjoyable and this has presented the group with its chief obstacle toward mass acceptance because there is no deep voice to counter the sound of Yes' falsetto harmonies, some have refused to accept the group and its unusual vocal style. If Yes were to change its format by adding a singer who can contribute a lower voice, then the band would lose its distinctive identity. The high-pitched singing is what sets Yes apart from myriad other British bands who can also play their asses off, a qualification that has become all too commonplace nowadays.

Forget your inhibitions and take The Yes Album home with you. It may not cure the common cold, but you'll never get sick from hearing it.

- John Koegel, 7-22-71.

"It was the addition of Steve Howe's guitar pyrotechnics that finally allowed Yes to find their true identity. The Yes Album is a giant leap forward," wrote J. D. Considine in The New Rolling Stone Album Guide