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Vaughan, Stevie Ray - Couldn't Stand The Weather - White Hot Stamper

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

White Hot Stamper

Stevie Ray Vaughan
Couldn't Stand The Weather

Regular price
$299.99
Regular price
Sale price
$299.99
Unit price
per 
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Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

  • A truly KILLER pressing with Shootout Winning Triple Plus (A+++) sound on the first side and solid Double Plus (A++) sound on the second
  • The bass is big, the overall presentation is huge, and the energy is jumpin' on this early pressing - this is the right sound for SRV's hard-chargin' Electric Blues
  • 4 stars: "Stevie Ray Vaughan's second album, Couldn't Stand the Weather, pretty much did everything a second album should do: it confirmed that the acclaimed debut was no fluke, while matching, if not bettering, the sales of its predecessor, thereby cementing Vaughan's status as a giant of modern blues."

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Stunning sound for this Stevie Ray classic! Just picture yourself in a blues club. Now imagine the volume being about ten times as loud. This is the kind of music you would hear and it would tend to sound pretty much like this, a bit messy but also real. If you're one of those audiophiles who likes pinpoint imaging, forget it. They were going for the "live in the studio" sound with this one, which means it's a bit of a jumble image-wise. But that's the way you would hear it in a blues club, so where's the harm?

This copy has very good presence to the vocals and guitars, keeping in mind that the vocals are usually well back in the mix compared to the guitars, which for a guitarist of SRV's skills is probably a good thing.

What Amazing Sides Such as These Have to Offer Is Not Hard to Hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1984
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We're Listening For on Couldn't Stand The Weather

Number one by far: Too many instruments jammed into too little space in the upper midrange. When the tonality is shifted-up, even slightly, or there is too much compression, or too much smear, there will be too many elements -- voices, guitars, drums -- vying for space in the upper area of the midrange, causing congestion and a noticeable loss of clarity.

With the more solid sounding copies, the lower mids are full and rich; above them, the next "level up" so to speak, there's plenty of space in which to fit all the instruments comfortably, without having them sound like they are all piled up on top of one another as is often the case. With more space and less compression and smear the upper midrange does not sound overstuffed and overwhelmed with musical information.

Number Two: edgy vocals, which is related to Number One above. Almost all of Stevie Ray Vaughan's recordings seem to have some edge to his vocals -- the man really belts it out on his albums, it's what he does -- but the best copies keep the edge under control, without sounding compressed, dark, dull or smeary.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus and maybe a bit better is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of other pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

Side One

  • Scuttle Buttin'
  • Couldn't Stand the Weather
  • The Things (That) I Used to Do
  • Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)

Side Two

  • Cold Shot
  • Tin Pan Alley
  • Honey Bee
  • Stang's Swang

AMG Review

Stevie Ray Vaughan's second album, Couldn't Stand the Weather, pretty much did everything a second album should do: it confirmed that the acclaimed debut was no fluke, while matching, if not bettering, the sales of its predecessor, thereby cementing Vaughan's status as a giant of modern blues.