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Reed, Lou - Transformer - Super Hot Stamper (With Issues)

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

Super Hot Stamper (With Issues)

Lou Reed
Transformer

Regular price
$249.99
Regular price
Sale price
$249.99
Unit price
per 
Availability
Sold out

Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus (often quieter than this grade)

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

  • With superb Double Plus (A++) sound or BETTER from start to finish, this early UK pressing is guaranteed to be the best copy of Lou Reed's classic Transformer you have ever heard
  • Walk on the Wild Side is on this killer side one - it's a Demonstration Quality track that will turn your audiophile friends green with envy
  • Our vintage Orange Label British import Hot Stamper pressing here showed us just how Tubey Magical the midrange of the album could be - thanks Ken Scott!
  • 4 1/2 stars: "... Bowie and Ronson gave their hero a new lease on life -- and a solid album in the bargain."

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CONDITION NOTES: *The first 1/8" or so of side two plays Mint Minus Minus to EX++.

Transformer is an absolute tour de force of '70s Glam Rock / Classic Rock / Alternative Rock. You've got Lou Reed teamed up with David Bowie (in the producer's chair!), Mick Ronson, Herbie Flowers and Klaus Voorman, and on top of that the album was recorded at Trident and mixed by the great Ken Scott.

Throw in the fact that this is the best set of post-Velvets material Lou would ever write and it is a recipe for success. There are so many good songs on here I won't bother to list them one by one. Satellite Of Love is especially good though, if you ask me. If you agree, and you've never heard the VU demo version, make sure to seek it out. It's completely different and very fun.

This import pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records can barely BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn't showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to "see" the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with the band, this is the record for you. It's what vintage all analog recordings are known for -- this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it -- not often, and certainly not always -- but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What The Best Sides of Transformer Have to Offer is Not Hard to Hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1972
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We're Listening For on Transformer

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren't "back there" somewhere, lost in the mix. They're front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next -- wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information -- fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass -- which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency -- the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing -- an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

The Players and Personnel

Adapted from the Transformer liner notes.

  • Lou Reed – lead vocals; rhythm guitar
  • Mick Ronson – lead guitar; piano; recorder; string arrangements
  • Herbie Flowers – bass guitar; double bass; tuba on "Goodnight Ladies" and "Make Up"
  • John Halsey – drums

Additional personnel

  • David Bowie – keyboards; backing vocals; acoustic guitar on "Wagon Wheel" and "Walk on the Wild Side"
  • Trevor Bolder – trumpet
  • Ronnie Ross – soprano saxophone on "Goodnight Ladies" and baritone saxophone "Walk on the Wild Side"
  • The Thunder Thighs – backing vocals
  • Barry DeSouza – drums
  • Ritchie Dharma – drums
  • Klaus Voormann – bass guitar on "Perfect Day", "Goodnight Ladies", "Satellite of Love" and "Make Up"

Production

  • David Bowie – producer
  • Mick Ronson – producer
  • Ken Scott – engineer

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus and maybe a bit better is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of other pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

Side One

  • Vicious
  • Andy's Chest
  • Perfect Day
  • Hangin' 'Round
  • Walk on the Wild Side

Side Two

  • Make Up
  • Satellite of Love
  • Wagon Wheel
  • New York Telephone Conversation
  • I'm So Free
  • Goodnight Ladies

AMG 4 1/2 Star Review

David Bowie has never been shy about acknowledging his influences, and since the boho decadence and sexual ambiguity of the Velvet Underground's music had a major impact on Bowie's work, it was only fitting that as Ziggy Stardust mania was reaching its peak, Bowie would offer Lou Reed some much needed help with his career, which was stuck in neutral after his first solo album came and went.

Musically, Reed's work didn't have too much in common with the sonic bombast of the glam scene, but at least it was a place where his eccentricities could find a comfortable home, and on Transformer Bowie and his right-hand man, Mick Ronson, crafted a new sound for Reed.

... Ronson adds some guitar raunch to "Vicious" and "Hangin' Round" that's a lot flashier than what Reed cranked out with the Velvets, but still honors Lou's strengths in guitar-driven hard rock, while the imaginative arrangements Ronson cooked up for "Perfect Day," "Walk on the Wild Side," and "Goodnight Ladies" blend pop polish with musical thinking just as distinctive as Reed's lyrical conceits.

...The sound and style of Transformer would in many ways define Reed's career in the 1970s, and while it led him into a style that proved to be a dead end, you can't deny that Bowie and Ronson gave their hero a new lease on life -- and a solid album in the bargain.