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White Hot Stamper - Jackie McLean Quintet / Bill Hardman - Jackie's Pal

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

White Hot Stamper

Jackie McLean Quintet / Bill Hardman
Jackie's Pal

Prestige LP
Regular price
$299.99
Regular price
Sale price
$299.99
Unit price
per 
Availability
Sold out

Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus to Mint Minus Minus

Side Two: Mint Minus to Mint Minus Minus

  • Jackie's Pal makes its Hot Stamper debut here with STUNNING Shootout Winning Triple Plus (A+++) sound from top to bottom - exceptionally quiet vinyl too
  • Dynamic, transparent, spacious and musical throughout - you won't believe how good this Jazz Classic from 1956 sounds
  • Another top jazz recording from Rudy Van Gelder - big, bold and lively, just the right sound for this music
  • "... no one could execute complex melodic lines with the speed and precision of Bill. He was a human "bebop machine," a player who could improvise for hours on a single chord and not run out of ideas..."
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This vintage pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records rarely even BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn't showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to "see" the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with the band, this is the record for you. It's what vintage all analog recordings are known for -- this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it -- not often, and certainly not always -- but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What the best sides of Jackie's Pal have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1956
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the studio

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Copies with rich lower mids and nice extension up top did the best in our shootout, assuming they weren't veiled or smeary of course. So many things can go wrong on a record! We know, we've heard them all.

Top end extension is critical to the sound of the best copies. Lots of old records (and new ones) have no real top end; consequently, the studio or stage will be missing much of its natural air and space, and instruments will lack their full complement of harmonic information.

Tube smear is common to most vintage pressings and this is no exception. The copies that tend to do the best in a shootout will have the least (or none), yet are full-bodied, tubey and rich.

What We're Listening For on Jackie's Pal

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next -- wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information -- fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness common to most LPs.
  • Tight, note-like bass with clear fingering -- which ties in with good transient information, as well as the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency -- the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the players.
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The saxophone isn't "back there" somewhere, way behind the speakers. They're front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would have put them.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing -- an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

The Players

Jackie McLean - alto sax Bill Hardman - trumpet Mal Waldron - piano Paul Chambers - bass Philly Joe Jones - drums

Old and New Work Well Together

This reissue is spacious, open, transparent, rich and sweet. It's yet another remarkable disc from the Golden Age of Vacuum Tube Recording Technology, with the added benefit of mastering using the more modern cutting equipment of the '70s and '80s. We are of course here referring to the good modern mastering of 30+ years ago, not the dubious modern mastering of today.

The combination of old and new works wonders on this title as you will surely hear for yourself on these superb sides.

We were impressed with the fact that these pressings excel in so many areas of reproduction. What was odd about it -- odd to most audiophiles but not necessarily to us -- was just how rich and Tubey Magical the reissue can be on the right pressing.

This leads me to think that most of the natural, full-bodied, lively, clear, rich sound of the album is on the tape, and that all one has to do to get that vintage sound on to a record is simply to thread up the tape on the right machine and hit play. The fact that practically nobody seems to be able to make a record nowadays that sounds this good tells me that I'm wrong to think that such an approach would work.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus and maybe a bit better is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of later pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic that is a key part of the appeal of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.


Side One

Sweet Doll
Just For Marty
Dee's Dilemma

Side Two

Sublues
Steeplechase
It Could Happen To You

Amazon Review

"Bill Hardman, obscure trumpet player extraordinaire"

--Samuel, Amazon Reviewer

... this is one of the few examples of Bill Hardman's recorded trumpet work in circulation (in fact, this was his "official" recording debut). I caught Bill live on 4 occasions, and each time he was in the company of more heralded trumpet players, over each of whom he was able to assert his mastery (including Freddy Hubbard!). Rarely does his name surface in discussions of Art Blakey's trumpet stars (Clifford Brown, Donald Byrd, Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan, Freddy Hubbard, Wynton Marsalis, Terence Blanchard), even though he put in extensive tours of duty with the Jazz Messengers on no fewer than three occasions.

He lacked the expansive lyricism and passionate sound of Clifford Brown, but no one could execute complex melodic lines with the speed and precision of Bill. He was a human "bebop machine," a player who could improvise for hours on a single chord and not run out of ideas...

The first track is an up-tempo blues on which Bill submits 16 dazzling, pyrotechnical choruses--the first five played unaccompanied! That's a feat I haven't heard from Diz, Clifford, or Wynton. All Bill needed was a better press agent--or more sponsors like Jackie Mclean.