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Super Hot Stamper - Stan Getz - Getz Au Go Go

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

Super Hot Stamper

Stan Getz
Getz Au Go Go

Verve LP
Regular price
$169.99
Regular price
Sale price
$169.99
Unit price
per 
Availability
Sold out

Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

  • With two seriously good Double Plus (A++) sides, this pressing will show you just how good our favorite Stan Getz album can sound on vinyl
  • Musically and sonically, this is a Must Own Jazz Album for audiophiles, perfect for those new to jazz as well as serious jazz aficionados
  • This was a magical night (or two) with Stan feeling the spirit and staying telepathically in the groove with his compadres all evening long
  • A tough album to find with the right sound and decent surfaces, which is the main reason we are rarely able to do this shootout
  • 4 stars: "Highly recommended for all dimensions of jazz enthusiasts." [We would of course give it the full 5 Stars]
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This Stan Getz record has the kind of LIVE JAZZ CLUB SOUND that audiophiles like us (you and me) dream of. More importantly, this ain’t no Jazz at Some Stupid Pawnshop -- this is THE REAL THING. Stan Getz, Gary Burton, Kenny Burrell and the lovely Astrud Gilberto, the living embodiment of Cool Jazz, are coming to a listening room near you.

Fans of cool jazz -- in point of fact, some of the coolest jazz ever recorded -- take note.

What outstanding sides such as these have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1964
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space
No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Cool Jazz Is Right

I've gotten more enjoyment out of this Getz album than any other, including those that are much more famous such as Getz/Gilberto (which doesn't sound as good by the way). This one is (mostly) live in a nightclub and it immediately puts you in the right mood to hear this kind of jazz.

Listening to side one I'm struck with the idea that this is the coolest jazz record of cool jazz ever recorded. Getz's take on Summertime is a perfect example of his "feel" during these sessions. His playing is pure emotion; every note seems to come directly from his heart.

What really sets these performances apart is the relaxed quality of the playing. He seems to be almost nonchalant, but it's not a bored or disinterested sound he's making. It's more of a man completely comfortable in this live setting, surrounded by like-minded musicians, all communicating the same vibe. Perhaps they all got hold of some really good grass that day. That's the feeling one gets from their playing. As one is listening, there's a certain euphoria that seems to be part of the music. This is definitely one of those albums to get lost in.

What We're Listening For on Getz Au Go Go

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next -- wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information -- fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass -- which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency -- the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing -- an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

A Top Test Disc

I also use this as a test disc because the third track on side 2, The Telephone Song, has a breathy vocal by Astrud and then Getz's saxophone solo follows. If those two elements in the recording are in balance, your system is working, tonally anyway.

Of course, you would never know this is a good recording by playing the average domestic copy. This Hot Stamper LP is one of the few pressings that can show you that such a wonderful smoky night club (to quote Bryan Ferry) jazz LP really can have Demo Disc sound.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of later pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.


Side One

Corcovado (Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars)

On the best copies the voice is perfection. The horn is always a bit hard sounding on this track though.

It Might As Well Be Spring

The best copies are warm, rich and sweet here, with much better sound for Getz's sax. This track has some of the tubiest magic you will find on the album.

Eu E Voce (Me and You)
Summertime

This one has real dynamics -- the playing and the sound are lively, but somehow still cool...

Nix-Quix-Flix

Side Two

Only Trust Your Heart
The Singing Song
The Telephone Song

The best song on side two, certainly the most fun, and a wonderful test track as mentioned earlier.

One Note Samba
Here's That Rainy Day

AMG 4 Star Review

... this recording hails from the venerable Greenwich Village venue, the Café Au Go Go, in mid-August of 1964 — two months after "Girl From Ipanema" became a Top Five pop single. However, the focus of Getz Au Go Go steers away from the Brazilian flavored fare, bringing Astrud Gilberto into the realm of a decidedly more North American style.

That said, there are a few Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions — "Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars)" and "One Note Samba" — both of which would be considered as jazz standards in years to follow — as well as the lesser-circulated "Eu E Voce."

Getz and crew gather behind Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein's "It Might as Well Be Spring," and the scintillating instrumental "Summertime," from Porgy & Bess. Other equally engaging cuts include affective vocal readings of "Only Trust Your Heart," and the diminutive, yet catchy "Telephone Song."

There is also some great interaction between Getz and Burton on "Here's That Rainy Day." Getz Au Go Go is highly recommended for all dimensions of jazz enthusiasts.