30 Day Money Back Guarantee

Dylan, Bob - The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan - Nearly White Hot Stamper

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

Nearly White Hot Stamper

Bob Dylan
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

Regular price
$549.99
Regular price
Sale price
$549.99
Unit price
per 
Availability
Sold out

Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

  • This vintage Columbia 360 2-Eye Stereo pressing boasts stunning Nearly Triple Plus (A++ to A+++) sound from start to finish, just shy of out Shootout Winner
  • Both of these sides are amazingly full-bodied, natural and clear, with Dylan front and center exactly where he should be
  • It's clear these classic songs have stood the test of time: "Blowin' in the Wind," "Girl from the North Country," "Masters of War," "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall," "Don't Think Twice," "It's All Right," and many more
  • 5 stars: "This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America... Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it."

More Bob Dylan / More Folk Music

100% Money Back Guarantee on all Hot Stampers

FREE Domestic Shipping on all LP orders over $150

These Nearly White Hot Stamper pressings have top-quality sound that's often surprisingly close to our White Hots, but they sell at substantial discounts to our Shootout Winners, making them a relative bargain in the world of Hot Stampers ("relative" meaning relative considering the prices we charge). We feel you get what you pay for here at Better Records, and if ever you don't agree, please feel free to return the record for a full refund, no questions asked.


Vintage covers for this album are hard to find in exceptionally clean shape. Most of the will have at least some amount of ringwear, seam wear and edge wear. We guarantee that the cover we supply with this Hot Stamper is at least VG


The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan is clearly our favorite of the early Dylan albums for both music and sound. We're picking up both mono and stereo copies when we see them clean (which is rare), and both the mono mix and the stereo mix can sound out of this world.

Hearing these great songs sound so intimate and lifelike on a top-quality pressing can be a sublime experience. We should know; we enjoyed the hell out of this very copy.

Having done this for so long, we understand and appreciate that rich, full, solid, Tubey Magical sound is key to the presentation of this primarily vocal music. We rate these qualities higher than others we might be listening for (e.g., bass definition, soundstage, depth, etc.). The music is not so much about the details in the recording, but rather in trying to recreate a solid, palpable, real Bob Dylan singing live in your listening room. The best copies have an uncanny way of doing just that.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of older recordings (this one is now 59 years old), I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it -- not often, and certainly not always -- but less than one out of 100 new records do, if our experience with the hundreds we've played can serve as a guide.

Did I mention all the great songs?

  • Blowin' in the Wind
  • Girl from the North Country
  • Masters of War
  • A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
  • Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
  • Bob Dylan's Dream
  • Talking World War III Blues

... and five more

These modern classics make this Dylan album, his second, clearly the strongest of his first four. You have to wait for his fifth album, Bringing It All Back Home, to find material this consistently brilliant and groundbreaking.

What The Best Sides Of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan Have To Offer Is Not Hard to Hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1963
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

With a pressing this good you appreciate Dylan's artistry completely. Early Dylan may not be for everyone, but if you're going to have just one of his early records in your collection, this would make a very strong pick.

The better copies are natural and realistic sounding, adding to the emotional power of these great songs. And a top quality copy played on an audiophile system lets nothing come between you and the music.

Watch out for nasality, thinness and somewhat edgy sound in the midrange. As you may well imagine, we take lots of points off for these faults, but all three are common to practically any vintage pressing you can find. The copies with the least amount of these faults do very well in our shootouts.

What We're Listening For On The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren't "back there" somewhere, lost in the mix. They're front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next -- wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information -- fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass -- which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency -- the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing -- an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of other pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

Side One

  • Blowin' in the Wind
  • Girl from the North Country
  • Masters of War
  • Down the Highway
  • Bob Dylan's Blues
  • Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Side Two

  • Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
  • Bob Dylan's Dream
  • Oxford Town
  • Talking World War III Blues
  • Corrine, Corrina
  • Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance
  • I Shall Be Free

AMG 5 Star Rave Review

It's hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record.

There are a couple (very good) covers, with "Corrina Corrina" and "Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance," but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" weren't just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic.

Although they've proven resilient throughout the years, if that's all Freewheelin' had to offer, it wouldn't have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy ("Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"), gorgeous love songs ("Girl From the North Country"), and cheerfully absurdist humor ("Bob Dylan's Blues," "Bob Dylan's Dream") with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it.