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Chicago - Chicago Transit Authority - Nearly White Hot Stamper (With Issues)

The copy we are selling is similar to the one pictured above.

Nearly White Hot Stamper (With Issues)

Chicago
Chicago Transit Authority

Regular price
$499.99
Regular price
Sale price
$499.99
Unit price
per 
Availability
Sold out

Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Side Three:

Side Four:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus*

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

Side Three: Mint Minus Minus

Side Four: Mint Minus Minus

  • A superb Columbia 360 Stereo pressing with Shootout Winning Triple Plus (A+++) grades or close to them on THREE of the FOUR sides
  • These sides boast some of the best sounding, boldest arrangements for a horn-based rock band we've ever heard
  • "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," "I'm A Man" and "Questions 67 and 68" are simply incredible here
  • Marks in the vinyl are sometimes the nature of the beast with these Classic Rock records - there simply is no way around them if the superior sound of vintage analog is important to you
  • 4 stars: "In April of 1969, the four sides of Chicago Transit Authority unleashed a formidable and ultimately American musical experience... an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar wailin' rock & roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements."

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*NOTE: There is a mark that plays 30 times lightly about 2" into track 1 on side 1, "Introduction."

These Nearly White Hot Stamper pressings have top-quality sound that's often surprisingly close to our White Hots, but they sell at substantial discounts to our Shootout Winners, making them a relative bargain in the world of Hot Stampers ("relative" meaning relative considering the prices we charge). We feel you get what you pay for here at Better Records, and if ever you don't agree, please feel free to return the record for a full refund, no questions asked.

Vintage covers for this album are hard to find in exceptionally clean shape. Most of the will have at least some amount of ringwear, seam wear and edge wear. We guarantee that the cover we supply with this Hot Stamper is at least VG


It's difficult to find copies that do this big production music justice, but we got hold of a hot one here. If you're a fan (and we think you should be, of the early band at least) you won't believe how good this album can sound on the right pressing. All four sides here are rich and full, punchy and solid, with great energy and dynamics. This is a Truly Killer Copy from start to finish

Huge Sound Can Be Yours

We love this album here at Better Records. It's amazing that this hard-rockin' band from 1968 could be the same band that gave us "You're The Inspiration" and other power-schlock ballads in the '80s. Have they no shame?

Fortunately, this isn't your Mom's Chicago. Here, with their freshman effort, the band stands on the threshold of becoming True Rock Legends. Even today the album still sounds fresh. Who can argue with the brilliance of tracks such as "Beginnings," "I'm a Man" and "Questions 67 and 68"? This is as good as the band ever got, man! It's all here.

All four sides boast some of the boldest arrangements for a horn-based rock band ever. These boys have no problem standing toe to toe with the likes of Blood Sweat And Tears. If you don't find yourself turning the stereo up during "Beginnings," this music is not for you. The energy they bring to their cover of Spencer Davis' "I'm A Man" positively puts the original to shame. They jam its rock and roll groove, then take it places nobody else would even think to go.

What The Best Sides Of Chicago Transit Authority Have To Offer Is Not Hard To Hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1969
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing these records are the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find pressings that sound as good as these two do.

Kath's Guitar Wizardry

The late Terry Kath was a Master of the Guitar, way ahead of his time in both songwriting and technique. In a VH1 interview with founding member and horn player Walter Parazaider, the world discovered that none other than Jimi Hendrix was a huge fan of Kath's. This should come as no surprise to anyone who has heard Kath's solos on 'I'm A Man'.

The meaty tone and nuanced texture of his sound are evident all over this album. It's also a precursor to so many other players that followed him in the four decades since his debut, many of whom would be nowhere without his genius.

What We're Listening For On Chicago Transit Authority

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren't "back there" somewhere, lost in the mix. They're front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next -- wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information -- fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass -- which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency -- the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing -- an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

Peter Cetera and Big Bass

Not many musicians qualify to be placed on the list of Most Underrated, but if there were any justice in this world Peter Cetera's name would be found right up at the top. His bass playing alone -- forget his singing, which is as good as any pop singer of his generation -- qualifies him for Most Talented (but for some reason) Most Overlooked Musician. The huge bass sound Peter got out of his axe is the meat and potatoes of this album.

Talk about beefy bass; this album is the poster boy for rock solid bottom end. When you have a copy of this album with a hot side three, you have a Rock Bass Demo Disc LP par excellence.

Again, it's hard to believe this is the same guy that sang and played on "Hard To Say I'm Sorry." His jazz-rock chops anchor the rhythm section with the kind of energy a band with as many pieces as this one simply cannot do without. Chicago boasts seven top players, but Cetera's brilliance cuts through on practically every song. People may not be able to appreciate his playing because they have bad records or bad stereos, but we're here to rectify that situation, as least the record part of it.

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of other pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

A Must Own Rock Record

Chicago Transit Authority is a Demo Disc Quality recording that belongs in any serious Rock Collection. Others that belong in that category can be found here.

Side One

  • Introduction
  • Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
  • Beginnings

Side Two

  • Questions 67 and 68
  • When the chorus comes in the bass had better be tight or the whole thing will turn to mud. The best copies have tons of energy and life on this song. Though not a hit, it still stands as one of the best tracks on the album and a real highpoint for early-period Chicago.
  • Listen
  • Poem 58

Side Three

  • Free Form Guitar
  • South California Purples
  • I'm a Man
  • Not the typical audiophile's first choice in a Demonstration Quality track, but if you have the right kind of stereo (a big one, natch) and a top quality pressing (for side three anyway), watch out.
  • This track has the power to knock you right out of your socks. The bass part that Cetera opens the song with has an unbelievably solid tone. At the same time it's harmonically rich and has subterranean power that must be heard to be believed. Holy Smokes does it ever sound good!

Side Four

  • Prologue
  • Someday
  • Liberation

AMG 4 Star Review

Few debut albums can boast as consistently solid an effort as the self-titled Chicago Transit Authority (1969). Even fewer can claim to have enough material to fill out a double-disc affair. Although this long- player was ultimately the septet's first national exposure, the group was far from the proverbial "overnight sensation."... In April of 1969, the four sides of Chicago Transit Authority unleashed a formidable and ultimately American musical experience. This included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar wailin' rock & roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. This approach economized the finest of what the band had to offer — actually two highly stylized units that coexisted with remarkable singularity.