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Super Hot Stamper - The Rolling Stones - Black and Blue

Super Hot Stamper

The Rolling Stones
Black and Blue

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Sonic Grade

Side One:

Side Two:

Vinyl Grade

Side One: Mint Minus Minus

Side Two: Mint Minus Minus

  • An outstanding copy of Black and Blue, with solid Double Plus (A++) sound from start to finish
  • The sound on this superb pressing is full-bodied and lively, with solid and present vocals, as well as excellent clarity all around
  • A full-bodied, solid copy like this lets you appreciate Billy Preston's contributions on the keys - he's all over the album, a very good thing indeed
  • "Melody ought to be a tentative experiment with Billy Preston's jazzy keyboard sound. Instead, it's a triumph, Jagger's voice swooping and snaking around Preston's piano and harmonies."
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Vintage covers for this album are hard to find in clean shape. Most of them will have at least some amount of ringwear, seam wear and edge wear. We guarantee that the cover we supply with this Hot Stamper is at least VG, and it will probably be VG+. If you are picky about your covers please let us know in advance so that we can be sure we have a nice cover for you.

This is, in fact, one of the better sounding "later period" (1976) Stones records we've played, that's if we're talking about the better copies of course, like this one. The best pressings are big, open, dynamic and full-bodied, with exceptionally lively percussion. As always, credit goes to the recording engineers, Glyn Johns et al., as well as Lee Hulko at Sterling, the original mastering engineer (who's cut about as many good sounding records as anyone we can think of).

Hand of Fate is our favorite on side one, sounding like an unreleased track from Exile on Main Street. I'm guessing Glyn Johns had a lot to do with that one sounding as meaty and raw as it does on the better copies. Following Hot Stuff, it balances that one's bright, clear sound nicely, making it easy to separate the real winners from the also-rans.

Billy Preston is all over this album on piano and organ and his contribution is crucial to the musical vibe on practically every song. (Organ on "Hey Negrita" and "Melody", piano on "Hot Stuff", "Hand of Fate", "Hey Negrita", "Crazy Mama", "Melody" and "Crazy Mama", string synthesizer on "Memory Motel", harmony vocal on "Melody", backing vocals on "Hot Stuff", "Memory Hotel" and "Hey Negrita", percussion on "Melody.")

What the best sides of Black and Blue have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1976
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments (and effects!) having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space
No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We're Listening For on Black and Blue

Billy's full, solid, clear piano sound. When the piano is thin, the mix is thin and that's not the sound you want on a Stones album.

If the piano gets lost, your copy either has a smear problem or a transparency problem. Those are certainly easier to live with -- all the '70s systems I owned were smeary and opaque compared to my system today and I enjoyed the hell out of all of them -- but far from ideal.

Less grit - smoother and sweeter sound, something that is not easy to come by on Black and Blue.

A bigger presentation - more size, more space, more room for all the instruments and voices to occupy. The bigger the speakers you have to play this record the better.

More bass and tighter bass. This is fundamentally a pure rock record. It needs weight down low to rock the way Glyn Johns wanted it to.

Present, breathy vocals. A veiled midrange is the rule, not the exception.

Good top end extension to reproduce the harmonics of the instruments and details of the recording including the studio ambience.

Last but not least, balance. All the elements from top to bottom should be heard in harmony with each other. Take our word for it, assuming you haven't played a pile of these yourself, balance is not that easy to find.

Our best copies will have it though, of that there is no doubt.

Vinyl Condition

Vinyl Condition

Mint Minus Minus is about as quiet as any vintage pressing will play, and since only the right vintage pressings have any hope of sounding good on this album, that will most often be the playing condition of the copies we sell. (The copies that are even a bit noisier get listed on the site are seriously reduced prices or traded back in to the local record stores we shop at.)

Those of you looking for quiet vinyl will have to settle for the sound of later pressings and Heavy Vinyl reissues, purchased elsewhere of course as we have no interest in selling records that don't have the vintage analog magic that is a key part of the appeal of these wonderful recordings.

If you want to make the trade-off between bad sound and quiet surfaces with whatever Heavy Vinyl pressing might be available, well, that's certainly your prerogative, but we can't imagine losing what's good about this music -- the size, the energy, the presence, the clarity, the weight -- just to hear it with less background noise.

One Tough Album (To Find AND To Play)

Not only is it hard to find great copies of this album, it ain't easy to play 'em either. You're going to need a hi-res, super low distortion front end with careful adjustment of your arm in every area -- VTA, tracking weight, azimuth, and anti-skate -- in order to play this album properly. If you've got the goods you're gonna love the way this copy sounds. Play it with a budget cart/table/arm and you're likely to hear a great deal less magic than we did.


Side One

Hot Stuff
Hand of Fate
Cherry Oh Baby
Memory Motel

Side Two

Hey Negrita
Melody
Fool to Cry
Crazy Mama

Excerpts from the Rolling Stone Review

By Dave Marsh - April 23, 1976 Although the Rolling Stones now sing about their children and families as often as their stupid girlfriends, we still try to retain our old image of them, under our thumbs and out of our heads. Musically, the Stones aren't the same band anymore, either, although the continued use of the same rudiments — the drumming, the ceaseless riffing, the vocal posturing — might make it seem otherwise at a hasty glance. But the band that made Black and Blue isn't the same one that made 12 x 5 or even Aftermath. But that doesn't mean today's Stones are not a great band playing great music. They're a different sort of band, playing a different kind of music.

There is plenty of good stuff left, although all of it is marred by the need for fuller, firmer instrumentation. "Hand of Fate," which isn't as melodic as the Stones riff usually is, is brought to life by a blistering Wayne Perkins guitar solo and Jagger's incredibly live vocal.

"Crazy Mama," the wild little rocker that closes the set, is hot stuff. It sounds as out of control as the Faces, although Wood doesn't play on it. (He's "in the band," but he only plays on two songs.) The lyrics are marvelous: "'Cause if you really think you can push it/I'm gonna bust your knees with a bullet." Those two are the only hard rockers on the album, and the only time Jagger pulls the standard macho-demonic act, too. The former is perplexing news, but the latter may be regarded by one and all as a good omen.

Jagger's new role is as a professional singer, and he's great at it. "Melody" ought to be a tentative experiment with Billy Preston's jazzy keyboard sound. Instead, it's a triumph, Jagger's voice swooping and snaking around Preston's piano and harmonies. If Black and Blue leaves us nothing else, it is the knowledge that Jagger has become a total pro in a way that, of rock's great white vocalists, only Rod Stewart and Van Morrison can match. This, with the album's two ballads, "Fool to Cry" and "Memory Motel," is material he can sing with pride until he's 50.

"Fool to Cry" harks all the way back to the confessional style of one of Mick's original influences, Solomon Burke. He talks and cries through the number, riding against the waves of Nicky Hopkins's string synthesizer. Stalked by the same lonely terror that haunts so many recent Stones numbers, Jagger is consoled and sometimes berated by his daughter, his woman, his best friends. He opens with a neat, oblique comment on his own parenthood, another sign of his maturity. But what is finally striking about the song is that Mick Jagger is now living up to his inspirations. He tried to match Otis Redding and Marvin Gaye for power in his younger days, and failed brilliantly. Older and wiser, he proves their equal as a singer of ballads.

For "Memory Motel," a sort of return to "Moonlight Mile," the stops are all pulled out. Once more, Watts propels the tune with his drumming. The story begins when Mick meets a girl before last summer's tour. (The real memory motel is near the house in Montauk, Long Island, where the band rehearsed.) But it soon becomes entangled with his recollections of the tour.

The singing is nothing less than spectacular. Jagger is powerful in his yearning, almost a supplicant. But the real revelation (as always) is Keith Richard, who sneaks in some really touching lines:

Mighty fine, she's one of a kind
She got a mind of her own
She's one of a kind
And she use it well

This is a perfect description of Keith Richard on last summer's tour, racing forward to sing "Happy" and running the show with more poise than he's ever been given credit for.

But "Memory Motel" is more than just a vignette or two. In the end, it becomes the perfect agony-of-the-road song, for it dwells not just on the difficulties of touring, but also on the ultimate joys: As Watts moves in like a locomotive, pushing the song upward, Jagger explains in one brief flash what it's worth to him, what keeps him coming back for more: "What's all this laughter on the 22nd floor?/It's just some friends of mine/And they're bustin' down the door!" There's no way to capture the exhilaration he expresses as his pals roust him from his reverie, lifting him away from his cares. For that one moment, at least, Jagger feels his music as deeply as he ever has.

I remember often these days how long it has been since rock was essentially a fad. Yet we still treat it cavalierly, dismissing careers on the basis of a single disliked album. We are often cruelest, too, to those who have given us most, seeing only the short term, and forgetting that we deal with careers now, not just one-shot hits. Black and Blue may not be the invincible Rolling Stones of our dreams, but that is also a virtue in its way.

Black and Blue leaves me remembering the first important lesson I learned from the Stones: "Empty heart is like an empty life." This may not be the same band which told us that, but those sullen teenagers would recognize this one, and be proud.

AMG Review

The Rolling Stones recorded Black and Blue while auditioning Mick Taylor's replacement, so it's unfair to criticize it, really, for being longer on grooves and jams than songs, especially since that's what's good about it. Yes, the two songs that are undeniable highlights are "Memory Motel" and "Fool to Cry," the album's two ballads and, therefore, the two that had to be written and arranged, not knocked out in the studio; they're also the ones that don't quite make as much sense, though they still work in the context of the record. No, this is all about groove and sound, as the Stones work Ron Wood into their fabric. And the remarkable thing is, apart from "Hand of Fate" and "Crazy Mama," there's little straight-ahead rock & roll here. They play with reggae extensively, funk and disco less so, making both sound like integral parts of the Stones' lifeblood.